FlipGrid #GridGuide #FieldNotes

Flipgrid+LogoFlipGrid is one of edtech’s most versatile tools, as its super user-friendliness applies from kindergarten to university to professional meetings and beyond. I’ve had the opportunity to use FlipGrid in many different educational settings:

  • in my own high school Social Studies classrooms  (I often make FlipGrid one of several ‘options’ for high school students)
  • as an Instructional Coach, one of my favourite parts of my job is introducing teachers to the fabulous flexibility that is Flipgrid.  One way we do this has teachers use FlipGrid to reflect on their learning after we have hosted a Professional Development session. Usually, Flipgrid is new to them and they are a little bit shy about the ‘on camera’ part, but by the time they leave, they are interested in using FlipGrid TOMORROW in their classes. So then I have an opportunity to…
  • provide support for teachers when they use FlipGrid for the first time in their classes; we have many ELL classrooms, and the teachers were over the moon when they started to use FlipGrid to give a voice to students as young as first grade
  • at our Distance Learning School, as the mode through which Language Arts students submit their oral assignments. What an improvement over previous methods – students are much more likely to submit oral assignments so I feel that I get to know them a bit better.
  • in a college Educational Technology course that I taught for pre-service teachers – when FlipGrid was new, I knew that I had to add it to the syllabus for the ‘video’ week in my course; see a sample topic from the course in the Disco Library
  • helping our video-conference teachers use FlipGrid to connect their stScreen Shot 2019-02-23 at 7.34.08 PMudents between remote campuses
  • as a method of bringing teachers together asynchronously to participate in District Wide professional book studies across 300+ Screen Shot 2019-02-23 at 7.39.25 PM.pngkm in our rural school division (check out this link to topic in FlipGrid’s Disco Library)
  • providing alternative ways of furthering our staff professional learning after hosting a Google Summit

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FlipGrid is excellent at sharing resources to help  train and inspire others:

FlipGrid is so amazing at sharing and crowdsourcing their resources that I barely need to create my own, but here are a few that I’ve put together to support my teachers and students:

And some tips for making FlipGrid easier to use in your classroom:

  • Shy students?? 
    • Let them start out by just recording their voice – let the video capture a book cover or a blank page
    • Keep the topic moderation “on” – that way you can see the student videos, but classmates will not be able to see each other’s videos – a “safe” way to start. Introduce students to the new My FlipGrid feature so that they can see all of their videos, including those that are moderated
    • design FlipGrid tasks such as scavenger hunts where students can record a list of objects, using the rear-facing camera instead of showing their own face
  • Young students?? Set up a center or station with an iPad and have them all record on the same device; the first few times they will need adult guidance, but after some practice, they will be able to click that green button and go!
  • Need to simplify video project playback??  Students can upload previously recorded videos to a FlipGrid topic, allowing them to easily be viewed one after the other for a class viewing party FlipHunt_Flipgrid_101_KozmaAnn_Kerszi-01
  • Scavenger Hunt??  Make it quick and easy with a FlipGrid #Fliphunt! Have participants use the rear-facing camera and “pause” the video while they collect all of the “objects”
  • Absent Students??  If you have a student that has been out of class for an extended period of time, use FlipGrid to record and send encouraging messages from classmates
  • Time Zone Constraints?? Ever try to Skype with a class on the other side of the world? Maybe not, because the ‘timing’ often just does not work.  Subvert the time zone curse by having classes communicate internationally using FlipGrid.
  • Teaching Alberta Grade 2 or 4 Social Studies??  Use #GridPals to find and connect with other classes in the communities or provinces that you studyScreen Shot 2019-02-23 at 6.58.45 PM

Flipgrid+Fever#FlipGridFever is what you catch when you love FlipGrid and are happy to share it with others.

With a little bit of training, you can submit applications to earn Certifications like the ones I have below. It usually involves a fair bit of work, but the learning is worth it.  Check out the video that I created for my Level 2 FlipGrid Certified Educator badge.

 

There are lots of webinars and Twitter chats to participate in and increase your knowledge of using FlipGrid.  certificate-Flipgrid + Formative Assessment

As you can see from the map below, Canada could use some FlipGrid #GridGuides, so hopefully this blog as my #GridGuide #FieldNotes will do the trick!

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2 Min Tech Tip: Adding a Bookmark to your Chrome Browser

As our district teachers spend more time on their new Chromebooks, as opposed to the desktops that we have used for so long, finding their way to oft-used sites has sometimes been a challenge.

Many have a series of click-paths that they go through to reach sites they use daily.  But there is a better way! Whenever I get a chance, I teach my colleagues how to bookmark those sites they use frequently.

Here is a 2-minute tech tip that leads you through how to create bookmarks in your Chrome browser and even organize your bookmarks into folders on your bookmark bar.

Trying Something New: The iWorld

Just over a year ago I got a new job in my school district as an Instructional Coach. As Instructional Coaches were a new role in our district, my Instructional Coach partner and I had the good fortune to get new laptops instead of hand-me-downs from the previous position-holder. In fact, we were even given a choice about the type of machine that we wanted.

At the time, I was also teaching a night class for preservice teachers at our local college. This was an Ed tech class and so students had all types of devices including Macs and they needed to use them for all sorts of technical “Edtechy” tasks, not just word processing. Generally, I thought that I was less able to help my Mac-owning students as I could only do basic navigation and thus less problem-solving. So after some deliberation, I decided that I would be a brave girl and take the opportunity to learn about using a MacBook by using one myself. After all, it’s good to learn new things.

It has been just over a year now that I have been a MacBook user. My history is certainly in the Android and PC world, so this new device required some new learning. I watched some YouTube videos, I asked some friends when I was really stuck, and slowly, I got the hang of doing things the Mac way. Fortunately, I forced myself to experience a similar learning curve a few years ago when our school district informed us that we would be using iPads instead of Chromebooks for in-classroom devices. I saved up and bought an iPad so that I could plan and test learning activities for my classes on our new school set of 20 iPads. This earlier foray into the iWorld, including doing lots of online training to receive “Apple Teacher” status, img_0344 helped shrink the learning curve when my MacBook arrived.

Like many people, I would say that there are things I like better about both the PC World and the Mac World. But what I do like, is the fact that I have essentially become bi-lingual, or dual-device-competent, or whatever the official word may be. Of course, I often find myself “Controlling” or “Commanding” on the wrong keyboard, but that’s a quick fix with a head shake. It has become second nature to locate and navigate files and programs in both worlds. As an Instructional Coach, this is certainly helpful, although most of our district devices are PCs and Chromebooks.

To fully complete my Mac integration, last January the Instructional Coaches finally received phones – new iPhone 8s along with other Central Office personnel. Having previously only ever owned and loved Android mobile devices, this was another change. But now, a year later, this is just another platform where I have become bi-lingual.
It’s good to learn new things.

One Step Closer to Google Certified Trainer Status!

Sweet Relief! I passed the Google for Education Trainer Skills Assessment! This 25 question multiple choice test is one of six hurdles that one needs to surmount to APPLY for Google Certified Trainer Status.  Even though I carefully completed and then reviewed the Google Trainer Course (another hurdle) offered on the Google Training Website, I still was quite worried as soon as I was a few questions into the test – there must have been a few rocks that I didn’t look under!

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Fortunately, I have already passed two other tests in the form of my Google Educator Level 1 and Level 2 certifications (accounting for two more of the six hurdles).   Now the final two hurdles remain:  finish off my 3-minute trainer video (which already has about 18 failed takes!) and submit the detailed application, complete with many links and “evidence” of skills.

Onward!

Teacher Flipgrid Book Study: Mid-way Musings

It’s a fascinating thing, this district-wide teacher Flipgrid Book study. My instructional coach counter-part, Cathy, and I are leading two different book studies with parallel methodologies, dates, etc…

This is Disciplinary Literacy

This is Disciplinary Literacy

Learning that Lasts

Learning that Lasts

The statistics to date:

  • We are at the halfway mark this week, focusing on the third of six chapters.
  • Between the two studies, there have been over 100 videos posted
  • The 100 videos have been viewed over 1000 times.

In past book studies that I’ve chaperoned, I’ve learned that, by the end, there will be some members who fall by the wayside – some who are just too busy, and others who just aren’t digging the book enough to contribute regularly.

This virtual experience is interesting in that the ‘wayside’ seems to have come more quickly! On one hand, we have several educators who are totally invested – they are meeting the suggested deadlines and adding rich video reflections to the posts of their colleagues. When I’ve seen them in person, they make a point of telling me how much they are enjoying this virtual book study experience. On the other end of the spectrum, we have some educators who have contributed only one out of four initial response videos required to date, and maybe one or two of the eight responses to colleagues that should have taken place by now.

Cathy and I are struggling to determine what constitutes an appropriate number of “reminders”.  As teachers signed up, we assured them that they could go at their own pace if necessary, and if they missed some weeks, they could just jump back in and continue. This flexible method has certainly been the pattern for a few teachers, but there still are those others who haven’t seemed to get off the ground.  So, what are some of the possible reasons?

  • it was report card season these past few weeks for elementary and junior high teachers, and those tend to be the ones who we’ve heard from less often – do we chalk this up to poor timing?
  • should we be sending a reminder every time that we approach a deadline? Our initial plan was to present a detailed schedule at startup so teachers could keep track of their own dates – is that too much to ask a busy teacher? do they just need a quick email or text to bump them into action?
  • is our timeline too tight? We’ve allowed two weeks to read each chapter. Before the next chapter deadline approaches, we’ve hoped that teachers have listened to and responded to the musings of their book study colleagues – are we asking too much in too short of a time frame?
  • after mid-December, we have a full month off for Christmas – will some teachers use this time to catch up and post a few responses that they’ve missed? or will that extra time just push the whole book study idea further from mind?
  • does this virtual landscape offer too little accountability? is it just too easy to “not do” if you don’t have to walk past someone in the hall the next day and explain why you haven’t ‘done your homework’?

Stay tuned for more musings as this experiment progresses! If you have theories, please comment!

 

 

 

 

Trying Something New: District Wide Virtual Flipgrid Book Study

Our Prairie Rose School District is a geographically vast space in southeastern Alberta covering over 29,000 square kilometres. It borders Montana in the south and Saskatchewan in the east. Our central office is located somewhat centrally, yet when teachers assemble for meetings they travel from schools located over 2 hours from the north and almost 2 hours from the south-west. So, as you might imagine, gathering teachers for professional development is a challenge.

Fortunately, it is 2018  and it is time that we started to better leverage all of the amazing access that we have to digital technology.  Many of our small, remote schools connect students via video-conferenced classes, but it seems we are generally less likely to connect virtually as educators.  To remedy that, my fellow Instructional Coach and I decided that we would try to provide valuable PD that didn’t require travel. By what magic you ask? We are attempting some district-wide book studies using Flipgrid as our platform.  Some of our participants are already using Flipgrid in their classes or school, and some will be catching #FlipGridFever for the first time.

We are featuring two books that align with our district goals of Deeper Learning and Literacy.  Participants will have approximately 2 weeks to read a chapter/section and respond to their choice of discussion questions. Then, to make it a ‘conversation’, they have an additional week to ‘respond to’ the musings of at least two other educators on that same chapter.

 

Have you read the books and want to join the conversation? Our participants include teachers and administrators from primary to high school!

Out of district? Go to flipgrid.com and use this guest code to check out the conversation about Disciplinary Literacy: a8d729a2

In PRSD8? Click here to check out and/or join our Flipgrid discussion on Disciplinary Literacy (or join code fea160)    or here for Learning That Lasts (or join code 4171a7)

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Using Blogs as a Reflection Platform to Deepen Learning

A classroom or school-wide blogging platform is a great tool for having students reflect on their learning. The beauty is that it can be used in ANY subject area, and perhaps is even more powerful in subjects where students don’t traditionally “write” in class.  Scaffold the reflective process for students by providing a list of possible questions that probe into their learning process.

For younger students – use SeeSaw or Fresh Grade –   While many elementary classrooms use Edublogs, other popular options for younger learners include platforms like SeeSaw or FreshGrade.  These sites facilitate parent views more easily, and provide easier access to including video for pre-readers and writers. Check out a SeeSaw overview here (grade 1 class)

Check out these student examples. Notice how the learning is deepened and extended as students reflect on their process.

1. In Foods Class: Appetizer

Student Reflection: For an appetizer we made Beet, Goat Cheese, Arugula Salad with a vinaigrette as a dressing. This salad stimulates the taste buds and therefore is a great choice for an appetizer. It altogether is very colorfuland flavourful.

This salad has a variety of shapes, from the thin sliced apples to the long cut red onion and even further with the crumble of the goat cheese and the unique shape of the arugula leaves. The texture also varies in this appetizer. The red onions are crunchy along with the apples while the goat cheese is smooth and melts in the mouth. The vinaigrette coats the salad and gives the dish extended flavor and shiny appearance. The salad has many colors within it. The bright red of the beets contrasts with the green of the arugula leaves. Red and green are complimentary colors and brighten the dish altogether. The clean bright white of the goat cheese contrasts with the other garnish, craisins which is a dark red. A variety of sizes are also incorporated into this dish. The leafy arugula, the sliced apple, and the crunchy pecans all help bring balance to the dish. With the contrast in texture, shape, size and color this salad is a great example of an appetizer.

If I were to make this salad again I would add less of the vinaigrette to the salad as it was drowning in it. I would also think ahead and plan the plating so that more of the toppings for the salad are visible on the plate. One thing I would keep the same is the placement of the beets. I placed them directly on top of the arugula leaves which allowed the other garnishes to stay clean and free of the red beet juice which would dye them.

2. At the culmination of a semester-long Current Events Project

Student Reflection: I learned about multiple events that I was not even aware that they had occurred. First of all, China and the United States have a well rounded relationship with many trials and tribulations. They are not always the best of friends to one another and can be focusing on their own national interests at times. However, China and the United Sates have a very important and on going tie to one another. Trade between the two is so vast that China is the second largest trading partner next to Canada. The relationship is beneficial to both and that is why it is still and will continue to be a fulfilling relationship. One thing that I was unaware of was that NATO accidentally bombed the Chinese Embassy building while bombing Serbians that were in Kosovo. This was a substantial event for this relationship.

I definitely learned much more about the world than I did before. Before this project, I was unaware of the significant impact that international relations have on each country and even further how it affects those around them. Taiwan, for example, was something that I was familiar with but I was unaware of the depth of the issue. Because of the project I can tell others about what I have learned and further explain the controversial relationship between the US and China.

Despite me learning a widespread of events that occurred between two nations I found that after numerous amounts of research it appeared to be a continuous spectrum of the same issues. Trade between these two countries was one of the main necessities for the relation and other than that there was not much to the relation. Learning about the history was interesting but if I could have switched I would have preferred a more impactful and possibly devastating topic to explore. These issues although information can be harder to find, would be more interesting to me. If I could have switched I would have taken that opportunity.

Some of the biggest challenges for me was not necessarily finding the information needed but finding the benefits and draw backs that came with the relationship. I myself did not fully understand the relationship even after researching it because there was numerous opinions about it. I was unsure which to believe. Citing my information came easy to me and I found that part of the project time consuming but easily done. I was hardly ever stressed over this project and I believe that is because i took time almost every weekend to do a little bit of the work and when the checkpoint came I was already finished.

To finish, my project is obviously an on going issue/relationship and therefore much will change. I will most likely still hear about the issue/relationship but wont go as far as researching it on my own. I learned vast amounts of information about events that occurred in the world and between the United States and China than I probably ever would have with this project. Therefore, it was a great way to help students learn more about the world and some of the issues that are arising and those that are continuing.

 

3. After a group project in Psychology Class

 Student Reflection:  I think the most enjoyable part of this project was being able to come up with different ideas and using that to our advantage. For example, we chose to make the project funny and a bit goofy, but at the same time still taking into consideration it needs to be professional as well. I believe one thing my group did really great on is coming together and deciding which aspect is our best qualities to work on, in order to get the project done. The part of the project I am most proud of is how well the project came together. Saying that, sadly we did not decide to dress up. However, it still turned out very well and my group still shares laughs while reading this. Some of the challenges my group faced was being able to focus and not being able to contribute enough. Since our project was so small it was hard for everyone to have something to do at all times. I enjoyed working in a group because this was a huge task, and I found it really cool how we got to pick our own and communicate our ideas effectively.

From Smart Notebook to Chromebooks

Like many of my colleagues in our school district, I use Smart Notebook with my Smart Board. All day, every day.  The lessons for just about half of my career have been developed in Smart Notebook, representing hundreds of hours of planning. But now we are getting more and more student devices in our district (some iPads and now lots of Chromebooks), so many of our classes can be operated in a one to one type of environment.

Notebook_10_icon_with_SMART_Logo

Smart Notebook software

Being a Smart Notebook geek, I get asked the same question very often: how do we make our Smart Notebook lessons work in a Chromebook environment? As a result, I will offer several options here, but there is a bigger issue at hand.  I don’t think that simply moving content from one platform to another is really the answer. When we first got our Smart Boards,  all eyes were on the Smart Board, and the only computers were in labs, or laptops/netbooks on carts that took 15 mintues to log into. But now that students each have a Chromebook, iPad or phone that they can access in a matter of seconds, it is time to design our lessons differently to take advantage of this opportunity for each individual student to have a voice and an answer.

First of all, let’s be very clear on one thing. There is no product that does all of the things like Smart Notebook does, such as save your written notes, allow you and students to rearrange objects on the screen with a simple drag, seamlessly insert screen captures with a single click, or even create new content with such ease. So if you are looking for an alternative, to some extent you will have to choose which Notebook-type features you are most interested in recreating or retaining, as that will influence your choice.

Here are several ways forward as we move to a more cloud-based environment.

  1. If you mostly use Smart Notebook as a glorified Powerpoint and show slide after informational slide with little interactivity and rarely write in the Notebook, then switching straight across to Google Slides is probably a fine option.  If you are like some of my colleagues and have been painstakingly copying and pasting the content from your Smart Notebook slide by slide to Google slides, there is a more efficient option.  From your open Notebook lesson, Export to Powerpoint, and save as a Powerpoint (this works best if you have not extended your Notebook slides beyond their default page size). Then open a new Google Slide deck, and Import from Powerpoint. You can choose “All” toward the top right, or select only certain slides. Your Slides will NOT be perfectly pretty and will lose animation from Smart, but web links should still work and most text and images should be individually editable. At any rate, this should beat the physical monotony of copying and pasting hundreds of Notebook Slides.

2. If you teach in a situation where you still have a desktop computer (with a recent version of Smart Notebook installed) connected to a projector, keep using Notebook! There are many ways that you can incorporate students and their Chromebooks from this set up.

a. Use Smart Lab activities. Starting in Smart Notebook 16, you can use the puzzle, monster or checkmark icons in the toolbar to have students connect with your Smart Notebook lesson from their devices.  When using these feature the first time, you may be prompted to make an account, which creates a “classroom” for you. If your school division has Smart Notebook licensing (such as Prairie Rose), simply use your division email to be recognized for an account.  This account will allow you to save game content across and between lessons. Now, using Student Response 2 (checkmark icon) or Smart Lab games (Monster icon) that have a phone device icon (such as Shout it Out) you can have students instantly send responses (text or photos) from their device to your lesson page.

b. Keep using Smart Notebook to display your content, and use a learning management system such as Google Classroom to push student activities to the Chromebooks.  You can do polling and feedback from within Classroom. Students can work independently or collaboratively in Google Docs or Slides or Drawings.  To take individualization a step further, you can take the video and website links from your Notebook slides and put them into Google Classroom assignments or announcements. Unfortunately, with Classroom, you can’t include much of the context and individualized instruction that might be included in Notebook, unless you insert each link as an individual assignment.

3. Use www.suite.smarttech.com Upload your current Smart Notebook lessons to the cloud with Smart’s attempt to go cloud-based.  Here lies one of the best solutions to the Smart meets Chromebook issue, but the technology is still very much in a growing phase.  You will be prompted to log in or create an account (see 2a) and then you can use the green + to upload existing Notebook lessons, PowerPoint, or PDF content.  These lessons now have a web link which you can send to students via Google Classroom, or students can go to HelloSmart.com and use a code to get to your lesson by joining your Classroom. Multiple students can then use their Chromebooks or iPad or other devices to navigate through your lesson at their own pace by moving objects, writing on the screen, pressing links. So for example, you could have 3 iPads at a center in your grade 2 classroom, and each student could be going through several slides of Smart Notebook activities at their own pace.

Over the summer, Smart will be adding the ability to actually view and save the students’ individual work by adding “Activity Pages” to your lesson.  When I first learned about this online portal about a year ago, I thought that this was the perfect solution to taking Notebook to the cloud, but there are some drawbacks. The biggest down-side is that currently, students can only view and/or interact with lessons that are open on a teacher device.  That means that if you put the link in Google Classroom, students cannot access any Notebook lesson of their choice at home, because it isn’t open from the teacher account.  Smart technicians do say they are working on this solution any time I have asked, but it does seem that the ability for any student to access any Smart Notebook from your Classroom/library at any time is a ways off yet.  Nonetheless, this is the most obvious solution to respecting the hundreds of hours you have spent developing Smart Notebook lessons!

4. If you realize that you might have to change a bit with the times, despite your love for Smart Notebook, there are some great solutions that take advantage of the digital access that our students have on a regular basis in our classes.  Products like peardeck.com or nearpod.com allow teachers to guide students through lessons giving all students a voice, all the time.  With these types of products, students join a classroom and participate in activities as the teacher pushes through the lesson. Activities could include typing an answer, answering a multiple choice question or poll,  drawing or identifying parts of a picture, or my favourite, put their opinion or position along a spectrum or agree/ disagree graphic.  The teacher can then choose to show all student responses anonymously on the screen in real time. The teacher also has a separate dashboard (open on a separate device like an iPad or in a separate brower window) where they can see each student’s responses.  The downside is that both of these options are quite expensive for the individual teacher, with Nearpod.com coming in at $120-$349 USD per teacher/year and Peardeck at $149/year. They do offer some free content, but only enough to explore a few lessons.  Screen Shot 2018-08-16 at 10.37.38 AMAbout a year ago, Peardeck came through with a real game changer when they offered a free “Add-on” to Google Slides.  The functionality is a bit less than the Premium version, but it is robust enough that you could use it do design all of your lessons. Check out a demo video.

So there you have it! Several different pathways to move – at your pace – from Smart Notebook all day, every day, to an environment that takes advantage of the growing number of in-class devices that our students have access to.

Something new: BETA student creation of VR Google Expeditions

Screen Shot 2018-03-25 at 8.05.52 PMUsually, when I have applied to be a part of a new Beta program, the response is that it is only available for residents of the USA (like when I applied to be part of Google AR[Augmented Reality]). Not this time! After bringing Google Expedition experiences to over nine hundred students in the past four months in Prairie Rose School Division, I was quite surprised when we were essentially “short-listed”, instead of the “thanks but you’re not from the USA” response. I had planted some feelers with Mr. Duchsherer’s Social 7 video conference class of Schuler and Jenner students in the off chance that this became real — good thing!

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30 VR Viewers inside MAX

 

So now we have a lot of planning to do. The big goal is to provide some Canadian content for Google Expeditions. Every time that a Social Studies teacher contacts me to do VR with their class, I hope that they are not teaching a year that is predominantly Canadian content! There are bits and pieces, but not many great fits for our Alberta Social Studies curriculum.

Some early ideas include historical and cultural sites within a three hour drive: NWMP Forts MacLeod, Whoop-up, Walsh; Medicine Hat teepee; Writing on Stone; Cypress Hills; Empress elevator; teepee rings. Perhaps we even do a Prairie farm and Ranch topic?

Lots of decisions and planning ahead!

Be sure to “Follow”this blog to follow along on this exciting journey!

Implementing VR #4: YouTube Playlist

Touring our PRSD8 Google Expedition Virtual Reality set around our vast school division has been quite delightful. The first reactions of the students from K-12 to the virtual world brings a smile to my face every time–as does the grinning teacher,  watching the first reactions of his or her students.   Yet, there is so much more to discover in the virtual reality world than Google Expeditions, especially since it (Expeditions) is so American based in content.

So it was with great excitement that we were able to successfully launch our first YouTube 360 playlist. A school in Oyen wanted to use VR “to do Olympic events” for an Olympic-themed day that they were having. Since nothing of the sort currently exists in Google Expeditions, I knew this was the opportunity that I had been looking for to push myself to try and create a YouTube playlist and use it with a class of students.

It turned out to be a great success, as over 10 groups of 10-13 students filed through our ‘viewing parlor’, took a comfy seat, and launched into our Olympic events playlist: bobsled, ski jump, luge, skeleton, downhill skiing, snowboard cross.  A few teachers even made it through the whole experience!

Watch below as the grade 1 students in Mrs. Roberston’s class experience the thrill of the ski jump!

This particular playlist worked very well for the small groups of students that we had a one time. A downfall to using YouTube is that you have to click quite a few spots to get to the playlist AND get the viewer into “Google Cardboard” mode. Cathy and I clicked all of the buttons each time for each student, as one wrong click, and it takes much longer to get back to the correct place.

A key element to using the playlist was to have a distinct acronym in the title (PRSD8VR). This playlist was the only thing that came up when searching YouTube, which then made it easy to select and save to the “Library”. Once we had put the playlist in the Library of every viewer, it made it much more convenient to launch the playlist quickly.

The Olympic theme certainly made the YouTube playlist a great place for a trial run. Thanks Oyen Public for helping push problem solving!