Padlet: Premium Panic Put to Rest

Less than a month ago, I wrote a passionate ode to Padlet for my college pre-service teachers who really didn’t seem to “get” Padlet’s adaptable uses for the technology-infused classroom.  Over the past year, I have fallen in love with Padlet again and again as they have added so many great new features; it has morphed significantly since I began using it in 2012 when it was still called “Wallwisher”.padlet 2

So, you can imagine my dismay, when an email from #DitchThatTextbook, a blog that I follow, was advertising a podcast called, “What to do now that Padlet isn’t free”.  I went into panic mode, as I use Padlet quite frequently in a number of settings – with my high school students, college classes, PD sessions as an Instructional Coach, as well as many other general uses such as mini-travel blog!

When I finally logged into my Padlet account, I did heave a sigh of relief, as I read Padlet’s “Dear User” letter. They informed me that I had a limit of 53 free Padlets, and my current count was only 50. So, I could sign up for the Premium version at $8.25/month, or just keep my account under 53 Padlets.

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I’m sure you can guess which I chose! And honestly, it was pretty easy to delete a dozen ‘stale’ Padlets from courses that I haven’t taught in a few years, or class duplicates.

Check out the podcast by #Ditch That Textbook’s Matt Miller, as he explains some rationale behind Padlet’s move to Premium.

 In the end, I applaud the number of features that Padlet has maintained on their free side. Unlike recent pay increases from companies like Thinglink.com, who have made it nearly impossible to use with students without bucking up the cash, Padlet still has a giant “free” learning playground.

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Something new: BETA student creation of VR Google Expeditions

Screen Shot 2018-03-25 at 8.05.52 PMUsually, when I have applied to be a part of a new Beta program, the response is that it is only available for residents of the USA (like when I applied to be part of Google AR[Augmented Reality]). Not this time! After bringing Google Expedition experiences to over nine hundred students in the past four months in Prairie Rose School Division, I was quite surprised when we were essentially “short-listed”, instead of the “thanks but you’re not from the USA” response. I had planted some feelers with Mr. Duchsherer’s Social 7 video conference class of Schuler and Jenner students in the off chance that this became real — good thing!

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30 VR Viewers inside MAX

 

So now we have a lot of planning to do. The big goal is to provide some Canadian content for Google Expeditions. Every time that a Social Studies teacher contacts me to do VR with their class, I hope that they are not teaching a year that is predominantly Canadian content! There are bits and pieces, but not many great fits for our Alberta Social Studies curriculum.

Some early ideas include historical and cultural sites within a three hour drive: NWMP Forts MacLeod, Whoop-up, Walsh; Medicine Hat teepee; Writing on Stone; Cypress Hills; Empress elevator; teepee rings. Perhaps we even do a Prairie farm and Ranch topic?

Lots of decisions and planning ahead!

Be sure to “Follow”this blog to follow along on this exciting journey!