Won’t this technology be obsolete?

In the college course that I teach on technology in education,  we spend the first two weeks learning Smart Notebook software. The previous instructor designed the course that way, and being a Smart Notebook devotee myself, I have followed that part of the outline, at least for the time being.

Although students may Smart Notebook softwarehave been in classrooms where Smart Notebook was used by their teachers, students themselves have mastered PowerPoint.  PowerPoint is safe and familiar. For most, Smart Notebook is a new software that does not respond like a Microsoft product.  Many students experience frustration as they work their way through the learning tasks, and if it wasn’t required for a college assignment, many would just give up and revert to PowerPoint, like many teachers before them have done.

In this atmosphere of early uncertainty and frustration using Notebook, one student mentioned how some teacher friends of his had told him that Smart Boards would be obsolete in 5 or 6 years.

Of course!

Technology is like that!  Are we still going to learn Smart Notebook in this course?  Absolutely.

The Smart Board technology display is changing rapidly – the part that, when used with a projector, is often just used to show YouTube videos in many classes.  Interestingly however, the newest school to open in our city this past September installed Smart Boards.

But the power is in the software — that’s the part that some of my colleagues have never taken the time to get to know, but these students will.

Once they can fully create with Notebook and have unleashed its power in their lesson planning, then by all means they can revert to PowerPoint or projecting Word documents on the Smart Board, or whatever new display technology they might have.  However, my experience is that for the majority of people, once they take the time to learn the power of Smart Notebook, their view of it as a teaching tool changes.

There are other reasons that learning Smart Notebook still makes sense. In our part if the province, almost all classrooms have Smart Board hardware on the wall and Smart Notebook installed on at least the teacher computers.  With oil dropping to $40 a barrel ( or lower!) it is unlikely that Alberta teachers will be in line for any significant, system-wide technology replacements in the near future!  And when these students graduate with their teaching degree in 2 years, their new classroom will likely still have a Smart Board, as will the classrooms that they do their pre-service teaching in over the next few months.

But mostly….technology changes.  When  I first started using Smart Notebook 10 years ago, YouTube was just being invented.  Showing a video on my new projector still required a lot of time and effort to capture it in a useable digital file.  And it was years after that before we could access YouTube from a school computer.

When I did my teacher training in the early 1990s, the internet as we know it didn’t exist.  In one of my mandatory university technology and teaching  classes, we had to do a test to prove that we could thread a film projector and another to show that we could create a properly centered overhead transparency sheet.  Most of my classmates never did use a film projector in their classrooms, but we all had binders full of overhead transparencies….until we got our Smart boards and projectors over 10 years later.

I did take another technology in education option course at university where I experienced frustration similar to that of my college students experiencing Smart Notebook software for the first time.  It was the early days of personal computers and Microsoft Word was probably in its first version. Our prof made us type a document with proper word processor formatting – he was going to view the formatting trail, not just what it looked like when we printed!  No more return at the end of every line and return twice to double space.  No 5 spaces to tab. We had to do fancy things like  bold some words….

It is laughable now, but it was an extremely frustrating endeavour, perhaps more so because it was the first time many of us had used a computer with a mouse!  But that frustration of learning how to use a product to its fullest potential was a most valuable experience, as ever since then, I have been a proficient word processor.  I’ve worked with many colleagues since who have struggled with Word, now the most basic of teaching tools, because they never really had to learn how to use it.  I guess it shouldn’t be surprising that many of them don’t use Smart Notebook either!

Yes, Smart Notebook may become obsolete. Or it might be like Microsoft Word and the rest of its Office – virtually unrecognizable from its original version 20 some years later.

That’s the world of technology in education. Ever-changing, but never going away.  So we will learn to use today’s most useful tools as they will lead to the tools of the future.

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2 thoughts on “Won’t this technology be obsolete?

  1. Hi Cammie,
    I believe this course is very helpful. I many not depend on smart notebook as much as others might, but I will for sure us it at times.
    Technology is forever changing. But its your choice to either accept the change and go with it or live in the past. I do still prefer to make lesson plans and curriculum documents in paper form, but that may even change by the end of semester.
    I have certainly experienced the frustration of learning smart notebook, but I know it will not only benefit me as a teacher, but also it can benefit me now as a student.
    Cassidy Muirhead

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